Khmer angkor dvd

 

Angkor Archaeological Park , located in northern Cambodia , is one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia .

Stretching over some 400 square kilometres, including forested area, Angkor Archaeological Park contains the magnificent remains of several capitals of the Khmer Empire of the 9th to the 15th centuries, including the largest pre-industrial city in the world. The most famous are the Temple of Angkor Wat and, at Angkor Thom, the Bayon Temple with its countless sculptural decorations .

Angkor Archaeological Park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1992. At the same time, it was also placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to looting, a declining water table, and unsustainable tourism. UNESCO has now set up a wide-ranging programme to safeguard this symbolic site and its surroundings.

Khmer angkor dvd

Baraka is an incredible nonverbal film containing images of 24 countries from 6 continents, created by Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson , with music from Michael Stearns and others. The film has  no plot , contains no actors and has no script.  Instead, high quality 70mm images show some of the best, and worse, parts of nature and human life.  Timelapse is used heavily to show everyday life from a different perspective.  Baraka is often considered a spiritual film.

Baraka is evidence of a huge global project fueled by a personal passion for the world and visual art. Working on a reported US$4 million budget, Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson , with a three-person crew, swept through 24 countries in 14 months to make this stunning film.

One of the very last films shot in the expensive TODD-AO 70mm format, Ron Fricke developed a computer-controlled camera for the incredible time-lapse shots, including New York's Park Avenue rush hour traffic and the crowded Tokyo subway platforms.

Some people find the lack of context in Baraka occasionally frustrating, not knowing where a section was filmed, or the meaning of the ritual taking place. However, the DVD version includes a short behind-the-scenes featurette in which cinematographer Ron Fricke explains that the effect was intentional. "It's not where you are that's important, it's what's there."

The DVD also includes behind the scenes footage, including scenes of the grueling shoot at Ayer's Rock in Australia, when a plague of flies of Biblical proportions made it impossible to film until they rigged up a vacuum to suck the bugs away from the lens.

Angkor Archaeological Park , located in northern Cambodia , is one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia .

Stretching over some 400 square kilometres, including forested area, Angkor Archaeological Park contains the magnificent remains of several capitals of the Khmer Empire of the 9th to the 15th centuries, including the largest pre-industrial city in the world. The most famous are the Temple of Angkor Wat and, at Angkor Thom, the Bayon Temple with its countless sculptural decorations .

Angkor Archaeological Park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1992. At the same time, it was also placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to looting, a declining water table, and unsustainable tourism. UNESCO has now set up a wide-ranging programme to safeguard this symbolic site and its surroundings.

Time flies! Its already one week since we returned from the 5-day trip organised by Viet Vision. I write now for two reasons: First, to apologise for the mixed up of arrival time at the Hanoi International Airport. I gave the departure time from Singapore as the arrival time in Hanoi, thus inconveniencing your guide, Anh and driver, Thuyen. I thank you for their patience with us. (I discovered my mistake after I came home).

I wanted to write to you and let you know that our trip was excellent. Once we would like to thank you so much for everything which surperd services you made for us. We had some great guides and drivers, and #1 would be Hoa and Tsao in Saigon and the Delta.

We felt that you prepared well for us, and we always had prompt attention to our requests.  The schedule went exactly as planned, and there were only a few items we would change in our itinerary.  
 
Thank you again for your prompt and detailed work on our trip.
 
Best Regards,
 
Pam and Dave Henkel
Vietnam Tour - April 2010

Back in 2007, I took a trip to Vietnam. Upon leaving, I swore I’d never go back. The only way I’ll give this place a second chance is if I meet a girl who really wants to go to Vietnam or if some business trip takes me there. Who knows what the future will hold, but for the time being, I never want to return. And the reason for that is one of my most-asked questions. People email me several times a week asking why, in this post about myself , I single Vietnam out as being my least favorite country. What could be so bad about it?

The simple answer is that no one ever wants to return to a place where they felt they were treated poorly. When I was in Vietnam, I was constantly hassled, overcharged, ripped off, and treated badly by the locals.

I constantly met street sellers who tried to openly overcharge me. There was the bread lady who refused to give me back the proper change, the food seller who charged me triple even though I saw how much the customer in front of me paid, or the cabbie who rigged his meter on the way to the bus station. While buying T-shirts in Hoi An , three women tried to keep me in their store until I bought something, even if that meant pulling on my shirt.