Nokia n8 location tracking lost iphone

 

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Nokia n8 location tracking lost iphone

Speaker, Kevin Lancaster, CEO of Winvale Florida GovCon Summit brings together the leadership of small businesses in defense, aerospace and technology for two [...]

Florida GovCon Summit brings together the leadership of small businesses in defense, aerospace and technology for two days of trends, training and transition. Winvale is looking forward to connecting you with resources within business intelligence to help you collaborate and succeed.

Winvale is looking forward to meeting and connecting with you at this event that is specially designed to benefit federal government employees and [...]

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There was once a time when my search for a new phone would start (and likely finish) with a visit to Nokia.com. The Finnish company had the widest choice, the best designs, and the most respected brand around the world, so it was pretty hard to pick a bad phone from its catalog. Try doing the same thing today, however, and you’ll find every link on the Nokia homepage  pointing to Microsoft’s Mobile Devices division — the new incarnation of the Nokia most of us knew and loved. It’s a vastly different mobile world we’re living in now, but what’s most striking about it is that Nokia saw it all coming.

Nokia’s biggest failure was an unwillingness to embrace drastic change. The company sowed the seeds for its self-destruction when it made "the familiarity of the new" the tagline for its big Symbian upgrade those many years ago. It feared alienating current users by changing too much, so it ended up with a compromised mess of an operating system that wasn’t fit for the future. Even as it was making one mistake, however, Nokia was keenly aware of the threat of another.

Jumping to Android was widely advocated as a quick shortcut to making Nokia’s software competitive, but Anssi Vanjoki dismissed that idea as a short-term solution that was no better than "peeing in your pants for warmth in the winter." I was among those who thought him wrong, but the recent financial struggles of HTC, Motorola, and Sony have shown him to be more prophetic than paranoid. Nobody outside of Google, Samsung, and Microsoft (by virtue of patent royalty payments) is making real money off the sales of Android phones.