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China SignPost™ aims to provide high-quality China analysis and policy recommendations in a concise, accessible form for people whose lives are being affected profoundly by China’s political, economic, and security development. We believe that by presenting practical, apolitical China insights we can help citizens around the world form holistic views that are based on facts, rather than political rhetoric driven by vested interests. We aim to foster better understanding of key Chinese developments, with particular focus on natural resource, technology, industry, and trade issues.

China SignPost™ 洞察中国 founders Dr. Andrew Erickson and Mr. Gabe Collins have more than a decade of combined government, academic, and private sector experience in Mandarin Chinese language-based research and analysis of China. Dr. Erickson is a Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Naval War College’s China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI) and an Associate in Research at Harvard’s John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. Mr. Collins is a J.D. candidate at the University of Michigan Law School. His research focuses on commodity, security, and rule of law issues in China, Russia, and Latin America.

The positions expressed here are the authors’ personal views. They do not represent the policies or estimates of the U.S. Government or any other organization. The authors have published widely on China-related issues. An archive of their work is available at www.chinasignpost.com.

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Language: English
Genre: Simulation, Tactical, Strategic
Turns: Real-Time
Complexity: Advanced, Expert
Period: Modern

The People’s Republic of China’s primary foreign policy concerns are energy security and trade .  Its industrial might and economic strength continues to multiply requiring significant resources from around the world. The sea lines of communication (SLOC) between China and the Middle East and Africa are the most vital and China has invested heavily in expanding and modernizing its Navy to protect this route denying potential adversaries the ability to influence Chinese policy by cutting these vital lines and rolling back adversaries away from the Chinese mainland.

China SignPost™ aims to provide high-quality China analysis and policy recommendations in a concise, accessible form for people whose lives are being affected profoundly by China’s political, economic, and security development. We believe that by presenting practical, apolitical China insights we can help citizens around the world form holistic views that are based on facts, rather than political rhetoric driven by vested interests. We aim to foster better understanding of key Chinese developments, with particular focus on natural resource, technology, industry, and trade issues.

China SignPost™ 洞察中国 founders Dr. Andrew Erickson and Mr. Gabe Collins have more than a decade of combined government, academic, and private sector experience in Mandarin Chinese language-based research and analysis of China. Dr. Erickson is a Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Naval War College’s China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI) and an Associate in Research at Harvard’s John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. Mr. Collins is a J.D. candidate at the University of Michigan Law School. His research focuses on commodity, security, and rule of law issues in China, Russia, and Latin America.

The positions expressed here are the authors’ personal views. They do not represent the policies or estimates of the U.S. Government or any other organization. The authors have published widely on China-related issues. An archive of their work is available at www.chinasignpost.com.

Since World War II, the sine qua non of maritime power has been the carrier strike group, that assemblage of warships and other assets which together comprise the floating fortress that is the king of combat sea power. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army–Navy (PLAN) is in the process of building its carrier strike group, although it currently only possesses one carrier still in the process of training aircraft operations. This article shows the current state of China’s efforts by listing and describing key pieces of PLAN equipment.

Although great attention is still placed on the traditional strike group, we should keep in mind that it will be the realms of cyber, space, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that will do the most to shape any future war at sea. China has placed great emphasis on these areas.

It is tempting to ask whether PLAN might skip the carrier strike group entirely, moving directly into a UAV-heavy targeting model while eschewing the powerful but obsolescing task groups of various vessels. The answer for the foreseeable future is “no.” China and its Navy still see the carrier group as being essential to great power status and are unlikely to abandon it.

The Type 052D destroyer (NATO code name Luyang III class, or Kunming class after the lead ship) is a class of guided missile destroyer s being deployed by the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy Surface Force . Currently it is being built at two different Chinese ship yards.

After the Type 052C destroyer ( NATO code name Luyang II class, or Lanzhou class after the lead ship ), two new hulls were spotted under construction at Changxingdao- Jiangnan Shipyard (JNCX) in August 2012. According to imagery, they were armed with a new 130 mm main gun and new AESA radar system. Altogether six vessels of this class are now fitting out or under construction, one vessel is on sea trial and four vessels are active.

Nearing the completion of the first 12 Type 052D ships, the PLAN will shift production to the newer Type 055 destroyer . [5]