Android locator axis

 

Android Sensors supports several sensors via the SensorManager , for example the accelerometer. Unfortunately, you cannot test the accelerometer on the Android emulator.

You can access a SensorManager via getSystemService(SENSOR_SERVICE) . The Sensor class defines several constants for accessing the different sensors.

You can access the sensor via the sensorManager.getDefaultSensor() method, which takes the sensor type and the delay defined as constants on SensorManager as parameters.

Android locator axis

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Android Sensors supports several sensors via the SensorManager , for example the accelerometer. Unfortunately, you cannot test the accelerometer on the Android emulator.

You can access a SensorManager via getSystemService(SENSOR_SERVICE) . The Sensor class defines several constants for accessing the different sensors.

You can access the sensor via the sensorManager.getDefaultSensor() method, which takes the sensor type and the delay defined as constants on SensorManager as parameters.

In this month’s column, we take a look at some initial efforts to independently process smartphone measurements. How good are the results? Read on.

IT WAS 1999. That was the year when the first mobile or cell phones equipped with GPS became available. Garmin introduced the NavTalk Pilot aimed at aviators and Benefon, a former Finnish cellphone manufacturer, offered the Benefon Esc! These devices benefited from the continuing reduction in the size (and power needs) of GPS receivers, which had been shrunk to just a few integrated circuits or chips.

I documented that progress in GPS technology in an article for this column in April 2000 titled “ Smaller and Smaller: The Evolution of the GPS Receiver .” In that article, I also mentioned that receiver modules had been made small enough to be put in a wristwatch. This was something that I and other researchers at the University of New Brunswick had predicted in a paper presented at a meeting in 1983. Talk about prescient.

What if we wanted to retrieve a WSDL file to give to a programmer who needs to talk to our particular service (and who may be using .NET or Python or something else to access it)? Once again, the Apache folk thought of this. We can grab the definition file simply by accessing the Web service and appending ?WSDL to the end of the URL. If I simply point my browser to http://localhost:8080/axis/Calculator.jws?WSDL, I get the XML descriptor sent back to me.

Although it is really easy and convenient to shove our Java code under the Axis directory as a .jws file, that will not be the way you deploy all of your Web services. A lot of the time we want more fine-grained control over the Web service, to tweak it, and to use other more advanced features. Luckily, with other tools, it is still easy for us to work with our code in a more formal manner.

After going through this full process, you will be able to create clients to any Web services (when given the WSDL), and wrap up any code, exposing it as a Web service.