Mobile spy reviews 2010 chevy equinox wheelbase

 

At 2:17 a.m. on June 6, 2010, an 800-yard-wide tornado packing winds of up to 135 mph ripped through the tiny hamlet of Dundee, Michigan. In its wake were damaged homes, uprooted trees, and utility poles scattered about like toothpicks. Amid all the windblown rubble surrounding the Dundee home of our copy chief, Cora Weber, sat our long-term BMW 750Li, amazingly unscathed and undisturbed. Fortune had finally smiled on the $119,080 luxury sedan. Previous spins of Fortuna’s wheel hadn’t gone as well for this particular car. After all, it should have landed in the hands of a caring, wealthy owner instead of the greasy, disease-ridden mitts of your humble C/D staff.

Like a big shiny Christmas present, BMW delivered our long-wheelbase 750Li xDrive in late December 2009 for a 40,000-mile evaluation. Our love of huge back seats and mobile status symbols notwithstanding, we requested a 7-series for a higher purpose: to see if the new car was indeed a return to form after the notoriously troublesome, overly ­complicated, over-the-top, overwrought, fourth-generation 7-series. Is that chapter of 7-series history over?

Styling-wise, simplicity appears to be back at BMW. But it’s only skin-deep. Greater-than-ever complexity and luxury lurk beneath the fifth-generation 7er, especially when equipped like our long-termer.

Mobile spy reviews 2010 chevy equinox wheelbase

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At 2:17 a.m. on June 6, 2010, an 800-yard-wide tornado packing winds of up to 135 mph ripped through the tiny hamlet of Dundee, Michigan. In its wake were damaged homes, uprooted trees, and utility poles scattered about like toothpicks. Amid all the windblown rubble surrounding the Dundee home of our copy chief, Cora Weber, sat our long-term BMW 750Li, amazingly unscathed and undisturbed. Fortune had finally smiled on the $119,080 luxury sedan. Previous spins of Fortuna’s wheel hadn’t gone as well for this particular car. After all, it should have landed in the hands of a caring, wealthy owner instead of the greasy, disease-ridden mitts of your humble C/D staff.

Like a big shiny Christmas present, BMW delivered our long-wheelbase 750Li xDrive in late December 2009 for a 40,000-mile evaluation. Our love of huge back seats and mobile status symbols notwithstanding, we requested a 7-series for a higher purpose: to see if the new car was indeed a return to form after the notoriously troublesome, overly ­complicated, over-the-top, overwrought, fourth-generation 7-series. Is that chapter of 7-series history over?

Styling-wise, simplicity appears to be back at BMW. But it’s only skin-deep. Greater-than-ever complexity and luxury lurk beneath the fifth-generation 7er, especially when equipped like our long-termer.